The must see crazy castle before the summer of 2015

It may not be Scotland’s biggest castle, but Kelburn Castle – 35 miles west of Glasgow – is certainly the country’s brightest. Forget the traditional grey or brown facade you see on most castles. An array of vibrant colours and oversized, abstract characters cover Kelburn, bringing a thoroughly modern veneer to the 13th-century building.

The Graffiti Project started in 2007 when the castle’s owner, the Earl of Glasgow, learned he needed to remove a cement render that had been added to the building in the 1950s. At the urging of his children, the earl, Patrick Boyle, agreed to have the cement painted before it was removed, so he invited a group of four Brazilian street artists to adorn the castle’s turret and walls with their unique style of graffiti art.

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Artists Nina Pandolfo and Nunca, as well as the twins known as Os Gêmeos, used more than 1,500 cans of spray paint to complete the design. The murals depict playful, larger-than-life cartoons in the surreal and imaginative style that the artists are known for in their native Sao Paulo. Their work quickly gained recognition as one of the best examples of street art in the world, mentioned alongside works by Banksy and Keith Haring.

The artwork was meant to be removed after three years, but because it drew visitors from around the world, the earl appealed to Historic Scotland, the government agency responsible for preserving historic buildings, to make it permanent. However, a 2012 inspection revealed that the cement was severely damaging the original castle walls, and the agency urged its removal.

Plans are now in place to remove the graffiti and underlying cement by the summer of 2015. The castle’s owners say they’ll hold a contest for architects and designers to find an equally unique design to take the artwork’s place – one that doesn’t damage the castle walls.

David Boyle, son of the earl, told HeraldScotland in July: “It could be anything, audiovisual elements, maybe, or lighting…we just want to put it out there and see what ideas we get back.”

While the graffiti has gotten most of the attention lately, the interior of the castle reopened to the public in April after a major renovation, with castle tours available in June, July and August. The surrounding grounds, which include forest trails and an animal park, are open to the public year-round, so anyone who wants to see the unlikely artwork firsthand still has time.

Courtsey: BBC

STREET ART WALK HAMBURG

What’s better than wandering through a city and finding little gems of artwork around every corner?

Fortunately Hamburg is a city that values good street art and after the sudden death of Hamburg most famous graffiti artist Oz last September (sadly he was hit by a train while spraying) street art has been given an extra push of attention.

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There are areas, which are almost decorated completely, others only have the occasional artwork. In this text I’ll try to show you around the areas where you will find a lot and there’s going to be something hidden for every taste. Also there are great cafés and bars in these areas, so don’t worry about your play time in between walking around. Please don’t only walk the roads I suggest, the streets are changing every day, you should definitely have a look for yourself as well!

Grab a friend, a drink and your camera and start exploring!

Let’s start a S-Bahn Sternschanze.

Getting out of the station, turn left and see what is currently papered under the bridge. This area is changing quickly, so make sure to take a picture of whatever artwork you like.

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After the bridge, turn right into Susannenstraße. Here you’ll find one of my favourites, the girl with the pink dress. I love the composition of the two smaller gentlemen appearing to be taking a picture of her and her bright colours which make her stand out in this already colourful street.

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Then turn right into Rosenhofstraße. You’ll find a vast amount of graffiti in every house entrance, so please take your time here.I especially like these stencil pieces and you will also find the pink girl’s little sister.grafiti05

At the road’s end, you’ll arrive at Rote Flora, an old theatre which has been squatted since 1989 and is decorated entirely with graffitis, stencils, drawings etc. And I mean entirely! It looks a little scary but every now and then it’s open for public concerts and you should dare to go in. Every single wall is coloured completely and it makes an important piece of history in the middle of the city.

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From there, walk on towards Karoviertel, which is another very alternative quarter, coined by it’s squatted apartments. These streets are also full of artwork, I found those two in a little alley leading to a playground.

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Then walk towards Reeperbahn, the red light district.

At the moment, you will find a massive mural by several artists, which is covering a building site.

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Like in the Sternschanze Area, you will also find several pieces of art hidden in smaller alleys or doorways. If the Reeperbahn is a little to “much” for you during day time but you are close to the harbour now, so if you still feel like walking around you could check out one of my favourite parks: Park fiction. Also there are plenty

of nice restaurants and bars in this area, so it’s definitely worth staying for a bit.

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Courtsey : Journeytodesign.com