The Best Type Of People To Travel With

Are you one of the best types of people to travel with? Traveling can be one of the greatest experiences of your life, teaching you independence and knowledge of other cultures. A huge part of travelling is the company you keep – who you travel with can make or break the trip.

Check out some of the best types of people to travel with. Are any of these you?

1. The Internal Sat-Nav

This person can take you anywhere you want. Market stalls? No Problem. The nearest toilet? Easy. The awesome bar you went to five days ago? They remember the route perfectly.

And if/when you do get lost; they will guide you home safely and quickly. This is especially useful if you’ve sampled some of the local wine.

2. The YOLO-er

Travelling is all about letting your hair down and having new experiences. With this person, you will never forget that. Expect sky diving one day, hiking the next, and beer pong championships to round the evening off.

Guaranteed to make every day of your trip unforgettable, the YOLO-er helps you to embrace every moment of your trip. Let’s face it, you can sleep in when you’re at home.

3. The Food Fan

If you’ve ever traveled with people who don’t care about what they eat, then you will know how great the Food Fan is to have around. Swapping noodles from the (usually) delicious local cuisine every day, the Food Fan is on a quest to broaden both their mind and their pallet. Their food enthusiasm is infectious and you will with no doubt end up trying the weirdest local dish on the menu.

4. The OCP

Travelers often like to be spontaneous, enjoying the freedom of not knowing what they will be doing the next day. While this is fun for a while, the Obsessive Compulsive Planner can be a great addition to your trip.

Booking boat escapades and reserving tickets for a crazy beach party, travelling with an OCP means you never have to worry about what you’ll be doing tomorrow – which is only a downfall if the OCP gets overexcited and books a swimming with sharks trip.

5. The Photographer

While they probably aren’t professional, the Photographer will always act like the real deal. They will go above and beyond the average travelers photography efforts, always making sure there is room in their suitcase for a decent camera. On top of that, they will actually remember to take the camera out when you go exploring or partying.

While you might scowl as they try to get you to pose, sweaty and sun burnt atop a mountain, later when you get home you realize how happy you are the pictures exist.

6. The Culture Vulture

The Culture Vulture doesn’t just want to get drunk on every continent. They want to use most of their waking moments exploring all of the new and different towns and cities they discover.

You may find the Culture Vulture annoying after five hours sleep, as they try to get you to hike four miles to a church, but once you get there you will always realize it was 100%, totally worth it.

7. The Survivalist

If the Survivalist was seven miles away from the hostel, with no money, no map and no language skills, they would still somehow be back within the hour. Nothing is a problem for the Survivalist – just an obstacle to climb around. From missing flights, lack of transport or full hostels, the Survivalist will save the trip at least once when everything looks bleak.

8. The Linguist

With a genuine interest in the locals, the Linguist is never far from his guide book – in the local language. They are picking up important words and phrases for every place they visit. This is one of the best types of people to travel with – especially when it comes to complicated food orders at your favorite restaurant.

9. The Light Traveler

While most people can’t wait to buy fun clothes for their trip, the Light Traveler brings only the essentials. After all, who needs three pairs of shorts when you can just re-wear the same pair?

While the Light Traveler is baffled by all the trinkets and souvenirs most people buy, there is always room in their backpack for you to store a few things.

10. The Small Spender

Travelling doesn’t have to be expensive’ is this person’s motto. This person’s ability to seek out the cheapest bars, restaurants and clubs will save you money on a daily basis.

Continuously getting you and your friends great deals for hostels and flights, you marvel at the ridiculous amount of money you spent on your last trip, while working out how to get the Small Spender to travel with you forever.

By Amy Johnson for Lifehack.org

MASROOR ROCK CUT TEMPLES KANGRA

The Masroor Rock Cut Temples are a little known architectural wonder in Himachal Pradesh. Just 38 km from Kangra town on the Nagrota Surian link road, is this amazing monolithic rock cut temple complex of 15 temples, carved out of a single rock. The complex is surrounded by deodar trees and along this complex is a small pool of water giving it a surreal feel of an era gone by. These are the only rock cut temples in north India.

masroor3In the centre of the complex stands the principal and most elaborately carved shrine – the Thakurdwara. This temple is carved inside and it enshrines black stone images of Ram, Lakshman and Sita facing east. The rest of the 14 temples (7 on either side of the central temple) are carved only on the outside. The entire theme of the temple carvings revolve around the festivity and coronation of Lord Shiva who is the centre of the Hindu pantheon. Locals believe that the Pandavs built the Masroor Rock Temples during their period of exile and pray in the temples even today.

masroor2The remote location of these temples protected them from the invading army of Mahmud Ghazni and their stone construction prevented severe damage in the 1905 earthquake. But now only a few of the original shikhars stand and some of the beautifully carved panels are in the state museum at Shimla. As such one is well aware of the neglect of most ASI monuments and The Masroor Rock Cut Temples are no exception.

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masroor4Surprisingly this exceptionally beautiful monument does not form part of any popular itinerary of Himachal Tourism. Road2Himachal plans to set this right…

You can see a detailed walk through by Google at http://goo.gl/WDrTY1

STREET ART WALK HAMBURG

What’s better than wandering through a city and finding little gems of artwork around every corner?

Fortunately Hamburg is a city that values good street art and after the sudden death of Hamburg most famous graffiti artist Oz last September (sadly he was hit by a train while spraying) street art has been given an extra push of attention.

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There are areas, which are almost decorated completely, others only have the occasional artwork. In this text I’ll try to show you around the areas where you will find a lot and there’s going to be something hidden for every taste. Also there are great cafés and bars in these areas, so don’t worry about your play time in between walking around. Please don’t only walk the roads I suggest, the streets are changing every day, you should definitely have a look for yourself as well!

Grab a friend, a drink and your camera and start exploring!

Let’s start a S-Bahn Sternschanze.

Getting out of the station, turn left and see what is currently papered under the bridge. This area is changing quickly, so make sure to take a picture of whatever artwork you like.

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After the bridge, turn right into Susannenstraße. Here you’ll find one of my favourites, the girl with the pink dress. I love the composition of the two smaller gentlemen appearing to be taking a picture of her and her bright colours which make her stand out in this already colourful street.

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Then turn right into Rosenhofstraße. You’ll find a vast amount of graffiti in every house entrance, so please take your time here.I especially like these stencil pieces and you will also find the pink girl’s little sister.grafiti05

At the road’s end, you’ll arrive at Rote Flora, an old theatre which has been squatted since 1989 and is decorated entirely with graffitis, stencils, drawings etc. And I mean entirely! It looks a little scary but every now and then it’s open for public concerts and you should dare to go in. Every single wall is coloured completely and it makes an important piece of history in the middle of the city.

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From there, walk on towards Karoviertel, which is another very alternative quarter, coined by it’s squatted apartments. These streets are also full of artwork, I found those two in a little alley leading to a playground.

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Then walk towards Reeperbahn, the red light district.

At the moment, you will find a massive mural by several artists, which is covering a building site.

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Like in the Sternschanze Area, you will also find several pieces of art hidden in smaller alleys or doorways. If the Reeperbahn is a little to “much” for you during day time but you are close to the harbour now, so if you still feel like walking around you could check out one of my favourite parks: Park fiction. Also there are plenty

of nice restaurants and bars in this area, so it’s definitely worth staying for a bit.

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Courtsey : Journeytodesign.com

Mandu- A Celebration in Stone

Mandu, is an abandoned city of ruins from India’s Mughal era. Perched along the Vindhya ranges at an altitude of 2,000 feet is Mandu or Mandavgad. A ruined city in the Malwa region of western Madhya Pradesh , central India. This fortress town on a rocky outcrop about 100 km (62 mi) from Indore with its natural defenses, was originally the fort capital of the Parmar rulers of Malwa.

Mandu, due to its strategic position and natural defences, was an important place with a rich and varied history. It was an important military outpost and its military past can be gauged by the circuit of the battlemented wall, which is nearly 37 km (23 mi) and is punctuated by 12 gateways. Towards the end of the 13th century, it came under the sway of the Sultans of Malwa, the first of whom named it Shadiabad – ‘city of joy’.

Mandu is a celebration in stone, of life and joy, A tribute to the love shared between the poet-prince Baz Bahadur and his beautiful consort, Rani Roopmati. The balladeers of Malwa still sing of their euphoric romance. The fort walls encloses a large number of palaces, mosques, Jain temples of 14th century and other buildings. The oldest mosque dates from 1405. Each of Mandu’s structures is an architectural gem; some are outstanding like the massive Jami Masjid and Hoshang Shah’s tomb, which provided inspiration to the master builders of the Taj Mahal centuries later.

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Jahaz Mehal/Ship Palace is situated between two artificial lakes, this two storied architectural marvel is so named as it appears as a ship floating in water. Built by Sultan Ghiyas-ud-din-Khilji, it served as a harem for the sultan.

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Hindola Mahal – meaning Swing palace is so named due to its sloping side walls. The Hindola Mahal might have been constructed during the reign of Hushang Shah about 1425 C.E. but may date to the end of the 15th century during the reign of Ghiyas al-Din,The Hindola Mahal may have been used as an audience chamber. There are a number of other, undated structures surrounding the palace – an evidence of the rich and glorious past.

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Hoshang Shah’s Tomb is India’s first marble structure, it is one of the most refined examples of Afghan architecture. Its unique features include the beautifully proportioned dome, intricate marble lattice work and porticoed courts and towers. It served as a template for the construction of Taj Mahal

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Jami Masjid Inspired by the great mosque of Damascus, this humongous structure is striking in both its simplicity and architectural style-with large courtyards and grand entrances.

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A large sandstone structure originally built as an army observation post , is known today as Roopmati’s Pavilion. Rani Roopmati – the love interest of Baaz Bahadur lived here and is said to have gazed at the Baz Bahadur’s Palace – situated below and also at Narmada river, flowing through the Nimar plains far below, a river which the queen revered. The Pavilion is a major tourist attraction and offers many scenic views. Rewa Kund- A reservoir constructed by Baz Bahadur for the purpose of supplying water to Rani Roopmati’s Pavilion. The reservoir is situated below the pavilion and hence is considered an architectural marvel.

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Baz Bahadur’s Palace – Built by Baz Bahadur this 16th century structure is famous for its large courtyards encompassed by large halls and high terraces. It is situated below Roopmati’s Pavilion and can be seen from the pavilion.

The mystical beauty of the monuments, amidst the sprawling lush green landscape and the purple sunset sky, paints the live picture of the bygone era. The effect is completed by the rich surroundings of mango, tamarind and banyan trees. The place is also famous for its ‘Khusrani Imli’, tamarind trees which bear fruit only in the rainy season and juicy custard apples

For being an abandoned ancient oasis, Mandu is relatively easy to get to — it’s a couple hours’ bus ride from Indore. But the real bonus of Mandu? There’s “almost a total absence of Western tourists.” And who doesn’t love an undiscovered spot? Contact Road2travel to discover Mandu

Landour

Landour, the lesser known twin of the “Queen of Hills”, Mussoorie, is an idyllic town, dotted with old country homes reminiscent of the days gone by.  Landour is located at an altitude of 6,600 to 7800 ft with spectacular views of the snow clad Great Himalayas, dense deodar forests, and peaceful slopes.

Landour is technically about 2 km from Mussoorie , its name comes not from any Garhwali word….but from the name of a tiny Welsh village, in Carmathenshire in Southwest Wales ..Llanddowror!. It was the custom, during the British Raj, to name towns after those “at home” being homesick and nostalgic. The Clock Tower at the beginning of Landour Bazaar is a landmark which is held to separate Landour and Mussoorie.

The Cantonment Act that came into being in 1924 had a far-reaching positive ecological impact on Landour. The title to all trees were clearly mentioned as being with the Army, and this has prevented a lot of deforestation, and as a result, Landour remains green, compared to Mussoorie. Another clause, which terms all non-governmental and non-military buildings post-1924 as “illegal”, has saved the town from rampant construction. In fact the British made a point of preventing Indians (even the royal families) from building in Landour, and so there is not a single residence of an Indian prince in Landour, which can only be found in Mussoorie.

Landour is a great destination as it is, even today, less touched by the evils of rampant modernization and tourism compared to its twin, Mussoorie – a green reminder of how life once was everywhere in the foothills of the Himalaya. What started as a convalescent depot for the British troops is today the preferred getaway of artists, writers and nature lovers. The seclusion and verdant mountain scenery are perfect to spend some quiet time and commune with nature. The area has long winding roads that are lined on one side by majestic deodar and pine groves. Here the air is nippier compared to the lower hill, and cleaner too as it is far away from shops and vehicular traffic.

Heading up from the Clock Tower to the top of the hill, a stiff climb takes you to Landour. The once cobbled streets of this tiny bazaar have now been tarred. The Castle Hill Estate where the Survey of India office is now, was the place where Sir George Everest mapped the Garhwal region. Also located in the serene environs of Landour is Woodstock School which was set up in 1854. The cantonment area here is home to the famous Sisters Bazaar. Shop here for home-made jams and cheeses. Landour was also one of the first places in India where an American classic such as peanut butter was made commercially.

The Landour Language School is housed right behind the Kellogg Memorial Church and foreigners come here to learn the local tongue! The school, which dates back to the 19th century, was founded to teach Hindi to newly arrived missionaries. They practise their skills at the  must visit Char Dukan, a neat little Landour hangout, a cluster of shops that sell tea and light snacks (a favorite hangout of Sachin Tendulkar, the famous cricketer) . It is here that you can have a breakfast of pancakes and Waffles, sip chai and people-watch.

Landour has a big imprint on the cultural map of India. The best-known of its citizens is the writer ,Ruskin Bond, The noted actor Victor Bannerjee, has a home here. Among the Britons who moved to Landour were the parents of Jim Corbett. Both had lost their spouses in the First War of Indian Independence of 1857, and would meet and marry in Landour. Tom Alter, the famous movie and stage actor, also lives here for part of the year. Bill Aitken and the travel-writer duo of Hugh and Colleen Gantzen also live in Mussoorie.

For your rendezvous with nature @ Landour contact Road2travel.

Before getting LEH’ed get LAHAUL’ed

Travel See Write

The best cure of Himalayan Hangover is to get high on Himalayas again.

Not even fifteen days had passed since I returned from Leh-Ladakh and I had already started dreaming of returning to my favourite abode – The Himalayas.

So when an opportunity of a long Dusshera weekend knocked the door, I planned a Himalayan quickie – a trip to Lahaul-Spiti.

Along with my friend and her 4 years old daughter I left for Manali on 1st October night. As usual, against the promise of reaching Manali in 14 hours, the bus took more than 20 hours. And it was a very treacherous and arduous journey.

Nevertheless, as I landed in Manali, the whiff of fresh Himalayan air worked like a soothing balm. We checked in our Conifer Woods cottage at Simsha village. Conifer woods experience was beyond words. If I could use one word to describe our hosts…

View original post 1,468 more words

Krishna Janmashtami

On every festival and occasions we feel to share it with Mogli Group. Its give us a delight to be with them and same we felt on occasion of Krishna Janmashtami and celebrated it.

We gathered our Mogli Group children and dressed them to Radha and Krishna it was spectacular to watch them enjoying. So here are some moment we want to share with you all.

Mogli Group Mogli Group Krishan Lela Mogli Group

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You Might be knowing but here is the significance of Krishna Janmashtami…….

Krishna Janmashtami is the celebration of the birth of Lord Shri Krishna, the incarnation of Lord Vishnu, who is believed to have been born about five thousand years ago in Mathura in ‘Dwapar Yuga’. Krishna Janmashtami is also known as Ashtami Rohini, Srikrishna Jayanti, Krishnashtami, Saatam Aatham, Gokulashtami and sometimes simply as Janmashtami. It is essentially a Hindu festival. The festival is generally observed on Ashtami tithi, the eighth day of the dark half or Krishna Paksha of the month of Bhadrapada in the Hindu calendar, when the Rohini Nakshatra is ascendant. This is usually in the months of August and September in the Gregorian calendar. The festival is celebrated with great enthusiasm and vigor by Hindus all over India and abroad. People observe fast the whole day, sing hymns and conduct prayers at midnight to rejoice the birth of Lord. Ras lila, dramatic enactments of the life of Krishna, are a special feature that is showcased in every part of the country, as it re-creates the flirtatious aspects of Krishna’s youthful days. Another interesting aspect of Krishna Janmashtami is the practice of Dahi-Handi. This game portrays the playful and mischievous side of Krishna, where teams of young men form human pyramids to reach a high-hanging pot of butter and break it.

History
According to the Puranas Krishna took birth on the 8th lunar day (Ashtami) of the waning moon of the month of Smvana at midnight, upon the moon’s entrance into Rohini asterism. This day is marked as Janmashtami. Krishna is one of the most worshipped Gods in India and belongs to the Hindu Trinity. He is believed to be one of the eight incarnations of Lord Vishnu. The story of birth of Krishna is an intriguing one. The story goes like this: One day Mother Earth was appalled by the number of sins that were being committed on her surface. She went to Brahma that God of the Gods and appealed to him for help. Brahma, after listening to her, appealed to Lord Vishnu who said that He would take birth on earth and His avatar will destroy every kind of sin that was being committed on earth then.

During that time, Mathura was in miserable state as Kansa, brother of Devki, had put his father, King Ugrasen in prison and declared himself the new king. To put an end to his evil rule, Lord Vishnu decided to take birth in the human form. As such, at the wedding ceremony of Devki and Vasudev, there was a divine prophecy which proclaimed that Vasudeva’s eighth son would kill Kansa. To protect himself, Kansa rushed to kill his sister but gave up the idea of killing after being assured by Vasudev that he will hand over all his children to Kansa. Kansa put his brother-in-law and sister in prison. Kansa killed all the six infants as soon as they were born. The seventh child (Balram) was saved due to divine intervention, when he was transferred from Devki’s womb to that of Rohini’s (other wife of Vasudev).

As Devki conceived the eighth child, everything around was imbued with benevolence and majestic beauty. Lord Krishna was born in the divine form with lotus like eyes, his palms bearing the signs of a lotus, while his sole has a swastika sign. He was adorned with jewels and was wearing a crown. Just as he was born at midnight, a chain of events astonished Vasudev, when he saw the gates of the cell flow open and all the guards fast asleep. He immediately thought of Nand, his close friend in Gokul and decided to hand over his child to him in order to save him from the clutch of Kansa. Crossing the River Yamuna, Vasudev reached Nand’s residence and exchanged his son with Nand’s daughter. Upon reaching the prison, the door got locked behind him and he was chained again as if nothing happened in between. The guards also woke up and after hearing the cry of the baby, informed Kansa about the birth of the eighth child. Just as Kansa rushed to kill the baby, it slipped out of his hand and flew towards the sky, proclaiming that the annihilator of Kansa was born and was safe.

Celebrations
Hindus all over India observe fast on this day and recite the life story and teachings of Sri Krishna noted in the form of ‘shlokas’ in Bhagwad Gita. Temples of Lord Krishna are decorated most beautifully and children are adorned as Lord Krishna and Radhika, his spiritual beloved. Krishna Leela or the plays depicting scenes from Krishna’s life, especially childhood, are performed. At midnight, when Lord Krishna was believed to have taken birth, an ‘aarti’ is performed and people break their fasts by feasting on sweets and delicious dishes prepared especially for the occasion. In many parts, the idol of baby Krishna is installed in a swing and offered sumptuous food, especially ‘Makkhan’ (butter) and ‘Mishri’ (sugar cubes).

Popular Places
Janmashtami is one such festival that is celebrated equally in North and South India. Preparations for the same start weeks in advance. Different parts of the country celebrate the festival differently. In South India, the celebrations are most prevalent in Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. In both the places, the idol of Lord Krishna is placed in a decorated mantapa. Bhakshanam (snacks and sweets in Sanskrit), are specially prepared for the festival, and offered to Lord Krishna. Along with it, fruits that are his favorites are also offered. In some parts of Karnataka, chakli, avalakki and bellada panaka are prepared especially for the festival. In North India, celebrations are no less than being called extravagant and splendid. While Gokul and Vridnavan (Lord’s birth and growing up place) witness flocks of visitors coming to the place to celebrate the festival at Krishna janamabhoomi, the other parts organize different events and practice different rituals to mark the occasion. In the cities of Mumbai and Pune, dahi-handi is organized wherein a group of men form human pyramid to reach a high-hanging pot of butter and break it. In the city of Dwarka in Gujarat and the eastern states of Orissa and West Bengal, people celebrate it with fasting and doing puja at midnight. Though the rituals practiced vary from one region to the other, the spirit and devotion to the Lord is same everywhere. Thus, it wouldn’t be wrong to say that Krishna is the most loved and celebrated God in India.

Road2Travel